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The 2019 National Electric Code requires a GFCI breaker on a 14-50 outlet.
Is it still not causing the same issue with many of the EVSEs having built-in GFCI and you put a GFCI breaker you risk constant tripping? OR you are saying if you hardwire you do not use a GFCI breaker?
 

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Is it still not causing the same issue with many of the EVSEs having built-in GFCI and you put a GFCI breaker you risk constant tripping? OR you are saying if you hardwire you do not use a GFCI breaker?
The GFCI requirement is for garage outlets. If your EVSE is hardwired, there's no outlet, so an ordinary breaker or AFCI breaker can be used.
 

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Thanks for all the feedback. I understand most of it. But it's a foreign language to me. I had a flip phone until 2 years ago. My gut tells me to install an outlet in my garage and Use the cable that came with the car. It's long enough. And hope for the best.🤞
Question for the Forum related to this: using the cable that came with my new Volvo XC40 Recharge and just plugging into a 220V outlet—the cable is too short to reach from the car in its parking space to the wall of my condo unit. The HOA won't let me hang the ChargePoint box on the wall, so it has to be this outlet + portable cable. I need a 25' cable to accomplish this, but the Volvo manual says "Only use the charging cable provided with your vehicle or a replacement cable purchased from a Volvo retailer." Yet on Amazon, there is an apparently perfect charging cable: "...32 Amp EV Charger Level 2, NEMA14-50 26ft 220V-240V Upgraded Portable EV Charging Cable Station, Electric Vehicle Charger Compatible with All EV Cars".

Volvo won't say if this charging cable is safe to use. Since the car controls the charging, is there really any risk of damaging the battery by using this 3rd party charging cable to charge the car?
 

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I'm no electrician, but it sounds to me like it would work fine, just as you say. I assume you've tried backing in to reduce the distance. My car is charging at 38-39 amps regularly with no problem. If you go for it, be sure to set the limit in the car to 32 amps or just below since that's the cable limit. You should be able to charge completely (or to 90% as recommended) overnight with that. I'd be a bit concerned that someone could steal the cable if it's publicly accessible to others. My son's two trombones and bicycle were taken from his locked garage cage when he was living in a condo.
 

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Question for the Forum related to this: using the cable that came with my new Volvo XC40 Recharge and just plugging into a 220V outlet—the cable is too short to reach from the car in its parking space to the wall of my condo unit. The HOA won't let me hang the ChargePoint box on the wall, so it has to be this outlet + portable cable. I need a 25' cable to accomplish this, but the Volvo manual says "Only use the charging cable provided with your vehicle or a replacement cable purchased from a Volvo retailer." Yet on Amazon, there is an apparently perfect charging cable: "...32 Amp EV Charger Level 2, NEMA14-50 26ft 220V-240V Upgraded Portable EV Charging Cable Station, Electric Vehicle Charger Compatible with All EV Cars".

Volvo won't say if this charging cable is safe to use. Since the car controls the charging, is there really any risk of damaging the battery by using this 3rd party charging cable to charge the car?
There are a few portable EVSE devices out there, a good place for EVSE reviews is the InsideEVs YouTube channel, he reviews many different EVSEs.
 

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I have used this charger for three months. It has performed flawlessly and is compatible with a 48 AMP charge.
It does not have WIFI or any other whistles and bells. It is a heavy duty 25 foot cable that works with the recharge port.

The charger works with the Volvo charging port. Smooth insertion and no issues with the disconnect.

I simply wrap it up and hang it on a hook. Or, it can be placed in the frunk.

1/2 the price of the Chargepoint

Available on Amazon


MUSTART Level 2 Portable EV Charger (240 Volt, 25ft Cable, 40 Amp), Electric Vehicle Charger Plug-in EV Charging Station with NEMA 14-50P (Update Version)
 

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MUSTART Level 2 Portable EV Charger (240 Volt, 25ft Cable, 40 Amp), Electric Vehicle Charger Plug-in EV Charging Station with NEMA 14-50P (Update Version)
I was just reading the 1 star reviews for the product on Amazon.
2 of them, if true, are very concerning:
"It is sold as a 40 amp charger but the cable is only rated for 30 amps"
"The fact that there is no UL approval on something pumping 40 amps of current raises a red flag"

Also 6 of the 1 star reviews claim that they experienced failures early in their ownership.
 

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Splitvolt, a US-based company that makes UL-listed charging equipment, would be a better choice. Cable length isn't obvious though.
 

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I was just reading the 1 star reviews for the product on Amazon.
2 of them, if true, are very concerning:
"It is sold as a 40 amp charger but the cable is only rated for 30 amps"
"The fact that there is no UL approval on something pumping 40 amps of current raises a red flag"

Also 6 of the 1 star reviews claim that they experienced failures early in their ownership.
I don't own the company and don't have a dog in this fight...
But, there are more certifications than UL. Realize there are companies that have EEC certification.
This one is TUV certified.

TÜV is a safety testing house based in the EEC, whereas UL is situated in the USA. Each testing company individually evaluates products to ensure that they safely meet the manufacturers claimed specifications, and that they are able to perform to the manufacturers claimed specifications, over a number of years

This charger has 5% negatives and five star recent revews with the 40amp
Of interest, the charge point has 4% one star reviews.
The Splitvolt has 6% one star reviews.

I
 

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The 2019 National Electric Code requires a GFCI breaker on a 14-50 outlet.
Except now a days EV cars charging cords have their own built in GFCI in the cord. And for a fact, most Tesla's plugged into a GFCI trip the breaker without even using the cord. So if you're installing an outlet for an EV cord, I'd skip the GFCI.
 

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Except now a days EV cars charging cords have their own built in GFCI in the cord. And for a fact, most Tesla's plugged into a GFCI trip the breaker without even using the cord. So if you're installing an outlet for an EV cord, I'd skip the GFCI.
Current code requires GFCI in the circuit supplying the outlet. It doesn't matter what you plug into it. Of course you can skip the GFCI, but you'll be at fault if someone is hurt, or property damaged, as a result.
 

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Current code requires GFCI in the circuit supplying the outlet. It doesn't matter what you plug into it. Of course you can skip the GFCI, but you'll be at fault if someone is hurt, or property damaged, as a result.
I have a question: Is a GFCI needed if the outlet is wired directly to the 50 amp breaker (nothing else on that circuit)?
 

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Yes. But check tou local building codes. They tend to follow the national electric code, but not always. Some places mandate more. Also some places late on what version of the code they follow. It sucks that EVSE makers don’t understand the issue people have . They are looking out for themselves legally but making the unit safe and avoid agony one seeing them, but their GFCI protection on a GFCI breaker causes false trips. I ran my outlet with enough excess cord that I can move it to hardwired easily and probably will at some point. I have to rerun some standard outlets in the basement garage and will put those in a GFCI breaker and probably move the Wallbox to hardwired then.
 

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I have a question: Is a GFCI needed if the outlet is wired directly to the 50 amp breaker (nothing else on that circuit)?
Yes. All outlets in the garage are required to be GFCI protected. Note that this is the current national electrical code. Not all localities have adopted this version of the code yet. Prior code versions didn't have this requirement.
 

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This got me curious so I just looked at my county and they are still on the 2017 National Electric Code. So for now I am legit. Still may hardwire it for added safety.

1086
 

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This got me curious so I just looked at my county and they are still on the 2017 National Electric Code. So for now I am legit. Still may hardwire it for added safety.
I installed a garage 14-50 outlet during remodeling of a rental house for EV charging, not on a GFCI breaker, for future-proofing. Renters moved in and for weeks I worried about what would happen if one of their little daughters stuck a paper clip into it. I switched off the circuit at the breaker for now and will hardwire in an EVSE if it comes to that.
 
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