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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to forum and first drive yesterday at temperature -27 Celsius. I was taking delivery 250 km from my home. Drove 125km with approx. 35.5 kWh/100km consumption. Entered fast charger for way point in google map. Arrived At charger with 22% SOC. 125kw DC fast charger. Car only took 82kw charge speed up to 50-60% soc slowdown. Seems the pre-heating the battery was limited by heater capacity du to high demande of cabin heating. Second half of the trip with a Google map fast DC charging station at the end resulted in same 82-85kw charging speed.
Question:

1- Is my assumption correct that the heater split its power between battery and cabin?
2- Is there a indication that the car has started to preheat the battery while on route to a fast charger?

2022 glacier silver on 20 inch.
 

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@M23-VFS – Could be wrong but I am fairly certain the cabin heat is provided by the heat pump, which is separate from the fluid jacket for the battery. Again I don’t recall how the Volvo is laid out compared to other cars. It may more have been to do with the fact that even warming the battery, the ambient temps were too cold for it to achieve the temps it wanted. Additionally, The cables were cold, etc. A lot of factor. Overall to be getting 82 kW at 22% SOC upon arrival in -27C seems reasonable to me given my past experiences. Anything above 75kW in the CMA platform cars at below freezing is reasonable it seems.

As for your second question, that was answered in another thread i saw— but sadly, there simply is no visual confirmation that the car is doing what you want. Tesla displays a preconditioning alert, to let you know it is prewarming the battery. Porsche’s Taycan lets you actually see the big 800V pack’s average temperature readout, so That you can watch it rise while driving to the charger. But Volvo doesn’t give us any metrics to alert us, regretfully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@M23-VFS – Could be wrong but I am fairly certain the cabin heat is provided by the heat pump, which is separate from the fluid jacket for the battery. Again I don’t recall how the Volvo is laid out compared to other cars. It may more have been to do with the fact that even warming the battery, the ambient temps were too cold for it to achieve the temps it wanted. Additionally, The cables were cold, etc. A lot of factor. Overall to be getting 82 kW at 22% SOC upon arrival in -27C seems reasonable to me given my past experiences. Anything above 75kW in the CMA platform cars at below freezing is reasonable it seems.

As for your second question, that was answered in another thread i saw— but sadly, there simply is no visual confirmation that the car is doing what you want. Tesla displays a preconditioning alert, to let you know it is prewarming the battery. Porsche’s Taycan lets you actually see the big 800V pack’s average temperature readout, so That you can watch it rise while driving to the charger. But Volvo doesn’t give us any metrics to alert us, regretfully.
The heat pump is not effective an probably turned off outside its working temperature range of +5 to +30 Celsius (XC40 P8 Heat pump). IT leaves resistive elements to heat the cabin and the battery.
 

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@M23-VFS – Could be wrong but I am fairly certain the cabin heat is provided by the heat pump, which is separate from the fluid jacket for the battery. Again I don’t recall how the Volvo is laid out compared to other cars. It may more have been to do with the fact that even warming the battery, the ambient temps were too cold for it to achieve the temps it wanted. Additionally, The cables were cold, etc. A lot of factor. Overall to be getting 82 kW at 22% SOC upon arrival in -27C seems reasonable to me given my past experiences. Anything above 75kW in the CMA platform cars at below freezing is reasonable it seems.

As for your second question, that was answered in another thread i saw— but sadly, there simply is no visual confirmation that the car is doing what you want. Tesla displays a preconditioning alert, to let you know it is prewarming the battery. Porsche’s Taycan lets you actually see the big 800V pack’s average temperature readout, so That you can watch it rise while driving to the charger. But Volvo doesn’t give us any metrics to alert us, regretfully.
Hard to say unless we have somebody in the “know”...you would hope that it’s all one big integrated system that can take heat and move it to where it’s needed...we know the car has an electric resistance heater for the coolant that serves the cabin heating, and on cars with the reverse-cycle “heat pump” that can also heat the cabin. You would assume that the heat pump cars also use the heat pump to heat the batteries as it would be much more efficient than using the resistance heater. The Teslas have that “octo-valve” thing and they can sort of direct the heat flow to where it’s needed (for example scavenge heat from the motors and move it to the cabin or batteries or whatever). Would be interesting to know how sophisticated/integrated the Volvo system is, or whether it’s separate systems.
 
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