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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And the lowest resale value of any SUV on sale? That dishonor belongs to the electric Volvo XC40 Recharge, which at 37.8 percent is worlds away from the SUV with the highest retained value at 84.1 percent. Yet again, the conventionally powered equivalent—the XC40 T5—fares much better, retaining 50.2 percent of its value after five years.

Like in the case of the Kona, when we compared an XC40 Recharge against the T5, we preferred the electric SUV. The Recharge is significantly quicker than its gas equivalent, and its lower center of gravity (courtesy of the floor-mounted battery) provides a solidity and confidence we're used to in German sport sedans. It's a nice little EV, but between the 208-mile range and savage depreciation, we worry it may not be long for this world.
 

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BEVs always have lower resale during the years when they are eligible for tax credits (resale amount takes into account that most people are getting a $7500 tax credit.). If you pull that number out, then values are higher. Also right now, there aren't a lot of other BEV SUVs to compare to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BEVs always have lower resale during the years when they are eligible for tax credits (resale amount takes into account that most people are getting a $7500 tax credit.). If you pull that number out, then values are higher. Also right now, there aren't a lot of other BEV SUVs to compare to.
Yeah, I was wondering whether or not the various rebates and tax credits figured in their calculations. If they're only using "purchase price," this would seem a bit misleading.
 

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That's my guess. We purchased a 2017 Bolt early on when there were zero incentives or rebates, just the tax credit. Within a year or two, they could be had for much less, and so residuals on the 2017 looked awful. (Though, that lack of incentives turned out in our favor when they bought it back due to the fire problem.)
 

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I see the Mach-E is on the list as well. Is suspect any EV not named Tesla will have weak resale until they are proven. Tesla is considered a luxury brand with unique appeal.
 

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Simple math. Car costs $59,000
Deduct 7500 rebate. True cost is 51,500
If they are basing 37.8% depreciation on MSRP,(which is what they do), they are valuing the depreciated value at 22300(approximate).
If one determines the base at 22,300 on the cost of 51,500, the depreciation is 43.4%.

And, non one knows what the value of the xc40 recharge will be as no one has sold a used one at five years.

These projections are like predicting the stock market in 2026. It's fun to look at but other than fodder for the internet, it has no real life meaning.

Volvo has pegged the depreciated value much higher. And they're the ones who are lending the money..
 

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Manufacturers always over value the car. I think all EVs will depreciate pretty hard as the technology progresses. With Kia/Hyundai/Genesis moving to 800V systems lowering recharge times will make older EVs less appealing to people that want to travel when they don’t want to wait 30-45 minutes to charge up. Also people that don’t have home charging will be more attracted to EVs that can charge up at public stations quicker. That said I like my Recharge and bought it vs. lease because my goal is to hold it for 6+ years so resale value in the short term is not a concern as in a few years we will sell/trade her T5 and pick up some other EV.
 
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We keep cars for the long haul and don’t worry much about depreciation — we make sure to run em til we feel we got our money’s worth, and then what we get we get.

This is new territory for us because after all the reading I’ve done, it’s still not clear to me what sort of battery degradation would be deemed acceptable during the warranty period and how much replacing those batteries would cost.
 
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We keep cars for the long haul and don’t worry much about depreciation — we make sure to run em til we feel we got our money’s worth, and then what we get we get.

This is new territory for us because after all the reading I’ve done, it’s still not clear to me what sort of battery degradation would be deemed acceptable during the warranty period and how much replacing those batteries would cost.
Maybe this will help:

The estimated battery life span (down to 80-70% energy retention) is 10-15 years or a total driving distance of 246,000-300,000 km/153,000–187,000 miles and 1,500 full charging cycles at 80% energy retention. The Volvo Cars Warranty is at least 78% energy retention after 8 years or 160,000 km/100,000 miles, whichever occurs first, provided that the car and battery are maintained and used in accordance with Volvo Cars’ recommendations.
 

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Kept my last Volvo for 23 years … was first gen awd. Plan is to keep this one until it dies but get a second one when we move / they work out a 340 range suv ev.
 

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We keep cars for the long haul and don’t worry much about depreciation — we make sure to run em til we feel we got our money’s worth, and then what we get we get.

This is new territory for us because after all the reading I’ve done, it’s still not clear to me what sort of battery degradation would be deemed acceptable during the warranty period and how much replacing those batteries would cost.
I posted a video in another thread that shows some insight.I also concur with @340driver and I am sure Volvo picked that warranty because they knew it would easily beat that. Considering I bought it as a daily driver car even at 75% with my current theoretical range of 230ish miles I would still have over 180 miles of range. And once it get s that old I would like start charging it to 100% vs the current 90% Volvo recommends. And if for some odd reason in 6-8 years I am still in love with the car and it is in great shape and I decide to keep it another 5+ years it would be worth investing in a new battery if it needs it.

The cars that tend to degrade fast are cars like the Leaf which does not do active battery thermal management and even they held up decently.
 

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Kept my last Volvo for 23 years … was first gen awd. Plan is to keep this one until it dies but get a second one when we move / they work out a 340 range suv ev.
wow, can’t even count has many cars I have had in 23 years, very impressive.
 

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Maybe this will help:

The estimated battery life span (down to 80-70% energy retention) is 10-15 years or a total driving distance of 246,000-300,000 km/153,000–187,000 miles and 1,500 full charging cycles at 80% energy retention. The Volvo Cars Warranty is at least 78% energy retention after 8 years or 160,000 km/100,000 miles, whichever occurs first, provided that the car and battery are maintained and used in accordance with Volvo Cars’ recommendations.
Thank you!
We got a Volvo platinum warranty extension on our XC40 to 10 years 120,000 miles. From what I can tell reading it, it looks like the battery system should be covered. It's an exclusionary policy, and excludes "all batteries except Hybrid/EV/Hydrogen High Voltage batteries." If I'm reading this right, we're covered for
ADDITIONAL HYBRID/PLUG-IN ELECTRIC/COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS/HYDROGEN COMPONENTS: Motor/generator belt tensioner; drive motor dampener; voltage inverter reservoir; three-phase high voltage cables; hydraulic or electric regenerative braking system; hybrid/EV/hydrogen battery (nickel-metal hydrate or lithium-ion drive propulsion battery) including the case and mounting hardware, junction block, main battery cable, and frame wire; onboard battery charging system including charge controller, plug in outlets, plug in cable, and trickle charger cable; electric AC compressor and motor; electric steering rack, gear, and motor; electro/hydraulic power steering pump and reservoir; hydrogen fuel cell stack; battery cooling pump; seals and gaskets.
What I need to figure out is whether the 80% rule is what is at play for those 10 years/120,000 miles.
 

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Sorry so long, but this pissed me off-

Funny thing about that article and related MT articles. What is the agenda? Guessing clicks.

Without doing a deep dive- The various MT articles about SUVs (Best/ Worst) don't coincide. Which is Best? Which is Worst?
We don't know , because they don't directly compare models/ manufacturers/ platforms.

EVs or ICEs? Hey, they are all "SUV's" so fair game, right? Why are they comparing ICE vs EV or PHEV in the same analysis?
No statistics or "source" are given because they don't exist (no one knows how these new Electrics will fare in 3 years).

IN THIS MARKET. Have any of the MT people actually tried to BUY a car, not "REVIEW" it?
Car manufacturers are setting (and manipulating) Residual Value currently. It's the Wild West out there.
We signed for 50% RV after 3 years on the XC40 RC.

Why were certain vehicles chosen and not others?
Seems pretty shoddy "journalism" IMO.
Why is a Buick Encore in the same list as a Volvo XC40 RC?
Why is the new VW ID.4 excluded?


Peace
 

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I honestly don't care. But then again I'm not the typical American car buyer. I don't buy vars for short term. For example.when I bought my Recharge In June I traded in my 2011 Audi Q5 for it. Car values generally (with exceptions) are all garbage over the life of the car.
 

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I knew going in the P8 would depreciate like a rock, but I bought anyway as I want to keep it 6-10 years. We even discussed if the car hold up well and it needs a new battery in 6-8 years it would still be worth it.
 
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I knew going in the P8 would depreciate like a rock, but I bought anyway as I want to keep it 6-10 years. We even discussed if the car hold up well and it needs a new battery in 6-8 years it would still be worth it.
Agreed. Love the car and hope it will be a good long term car. Like you we expect to replace the battery latter if all goes well.
 
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