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Thanks. I will need to figure out power, while I have a 150A panel not sure I would want 2 cars pully 40A at same time.
The alternative as you mentioned is to set up two circuit-sharing J1722 chargers, or two sharing Tesla HPWCs. Unfortunately every EVSE manufacturer has their own incompatible circuit-sharing protocol, so you can't mix Tesla and J1772 EVSEs on the same circuit.
 

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The alternative as you mentioned is to set up two circuit-sharing J1722 chargers, or two sharing Tesla HPWCs. Unfortunately every EVSE manufacturer has their own incompatible circuit-sharing protocol, so you can't mix Tesla and J1772 EVSEs on the same circuit.
Yeah, My Wallbox has it, just would need to get a second one.
 

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Certainly if you fast charge occasionally you probably don't care about the time, but if you do it frequently it starts to make a difference. My time is valuable to me whether I am getting paid for it or not, especially since I already have a 3+ hour commute.

During the summer my electricity costs me almost $.60/kwh in the evenings. That's 6 times higher the price at night. That means I can't just leave it plugged in. Being able to charge faster and on a timer is an additional reason to get a level 2 charger.


I'm not saying your wrong, I was just providing context for others who have different situations. Yes, that could be longer commutes or it could be time of use electric rates or less access to available fast charging because of distance or being in high demand.

I had previously put together a sheet that compares electric rates in San Diego and shows what commute length mandates each rate plan. I assumed level 2 charging. I suppose I could extend it to show level 1 charging with and without a timer.

Finally, not installing a charger now because something better well come along is probably not a great idea for two reasons.

First Level 2 charging is fairly maxed out at this point. A 60 AMP 220 V circuit is probably as big as most houses can handle. Second, the current incentives to install a home charger will not last forever and, as someone else pointed out, most of the work will be useful in the future. If you can take advantage of the tax break and you will do it someday then installing now makes sense.

In addition to the timer I've mentioned before there are additional non financial reasons to use an L2 charger including monitoring and alerts. Yesterday my GFCI circuit in the garage had tripped and I didn't realize the car was not being charged until it was too late to charge it
This is the reason I put the formula and anyone can change the assumptions (rate, installation cost), and find the right break even point. That's really case by case.

But talking about if installing a charger or not is different. My house has phone jacks in every room, including bathrooms. The house was originally built in 1980s, and probably had some major renovation 10-20 years ago. I basically do not use any of the phone jacks. But I can understand why they are there. The same thing for cat5 Ethernet cable, my computers now only connect thru WiFi. Now everyone uses wifi and watch YouTube, Netflix, etc, then what's the point to have TV coaxial for bedrooms and living rooms. If you replace all regular power outlet with the one with regular USB charge ports. Then you soon will find your smart devices all begin to use USB-c. I still have a lot of USB cables for printers but I do not know what to do with them. Maybe just throw them away.

I would never think the charging technology will not get any improvement or even totally changed.

And keep in mind the so-called evse is not a charger. The charger is in your car. The evse is basically a smart power extension cord type of thing. And in my opinion, they are all overpriced.

I notice some people may have two EVs, so maybe evse is really needed right now. Also you may have ridiculously high peak electricity rate, then it's better to have it. And so on. It really depends.

But my point is, install it if you think you really need it now. Do not install it simply because you think you may have good use of it later.
 

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when i picked up my car yesterday i was offered the choice of either a $500 ChargePoint credit or ChargePoint Home Charger.
Given that my electrician told me it would cost over $2k to extend a 220V line from our basement to the garage, as it would have to go through our finished basement, we opted for credit. Looking back I realized the home charger is valued at over $699!

What did everyone else choose?
ChargePoint HomeFlex is in high demand and is back ordered several weeks. The price has gone up considerably, like almost $1400 at Amazon. You could’ve doubled your money. I think it’s still around $699 direct from ChargePoint. I elected for the Chargepoint and received mine after 4 weeks. I still haven’t used my $500 credit from my Polestar 2 as I’ve been using my other Home Charger. At some point, if I go on a longer than 200 mile round trip, I’ll probably get to use it.
 

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So if we go for the charger we get one in a box we can use later? Is there a selection to choose from or just one model? Is there a link to it/them?

At present in a condo and so cannot use the charger but chargepoint is not handy I use EA, EVGo, greenlots so the charging credit would be useless and we will move as soon as the housing market re overs.

Charging in the world is easy but I cannot wait to charge at home.
 

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If you selected the Charger, Volvo fills out a form for you that you then sign and they submit to Volvo. After a few weeks, you'll get an email from Volvo with a link and a code. The link is set up to point to Chargepoint's website where you can select one of two types depending on the 220V outlet you want (NEMA 14-50 or 6-50). The NEMA 14-50 is a 4 prong plug with neutral and ground, whereas the 6-50 is for older 3-prong (like for a Clothes Dryer). 40Amp connection can be inserted into the plug. If you want 50Amp, you'll need to direct wire to the charger.

Make sure to keep bugging your dealer to confirm that they have submitted the form.
Yes, they shipment comes in a box, so you can install and use later.
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This charges faster than the free cable that came with the car? Only charged public so far so not up on the home charging side of things.
 

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So what is the hone charger for? 600 dollars of?
 

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The cable that comes with the car is capable of 40amps of charge in the same outlet that a ChargePoint can use. The difference is a few things:

- the Volvo cable is a just that a cable, meaning finding a way to run it or keep wrapping it up after use. Also it does tend to put some weight/pull on the outlet as it is dead weight on the outlet. Regardless if you use the Volvo cable or an EVSE make sure you have a commercial outlet installed. I highly recommend the Hubbell Commercial 14-50 as it is designed for constant high power draws. Cheap outlets (Leviton) tend to not handle the constant draw well and may malfunction of time. There have been reports of some cheaper outlets melting as the insulators fail over time.

- the Volvo cable is very thick and bulky making is a bit of a pain to wrangle on an on going basis

- The ChargePoint and many smart EVSE devices can be set up on a schedule. Many power companies will offer you incentives either in deep discounted rates or free power if used at off peak times. My power company has a rate that gives me 400 kWH each month free between midnight and 6am. After that during the same window it is $0.045 per kWh. The first month I had the Bolov it did not cost me anything to charge. This past month it looks like $4 and so far I have 980 miles on the car. My guess is once summer is over and my AC usage drops the car will probably
 

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The cable that comes with the car is capable of 40amps of charge in the same outlet that a ChargePoint can use. The difference is a few things:

- the Volvo cable is a just that a cable, meaning finding a way to run it or keep wrapping it up after use. Also it does tend to put some weight/pull on the outlet as it is dead weight on the outlet. Regardless if you use the Volvo cable or an EVSE make sure you have a commercial outlet installed. I highly recommend the Hubbell Commercial 14-50 as it is designed for constant high power draws. Cheap outlets (Leviton) tend to not handle the constant draw well and may malfunction of time. There have been reports of some cheaper outlets melting as the insulators fail over time.

- the Volvo cable is very thick and bulky making is a bit of a pain to wrangle on an on going basis

- The ChargePoint and many smart EVSE devices can be set up on a schedule. Many power companies will offer you incentives either in deep discounted rates or free power if used at off peak times. My power company has a rate that gives me 400 kWH each month free between midnight and 6am. After that during the same window it is $0.045 per kWh. The first month I had the Bolov it did not cost me anything to charge. This past month it looks like $4 and so far I have 980 miles on the car. My guess is once summer is over and my AC usage drops the car will probably
Good info thanks. Nice power company giving out free power off peak! Glad someone is embracing evs as my state is not.
 

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Good info thanks. Nice power company giving out free power off peak! Glad someone is embracing evs as my state is not.
It actually makes sense for them as it costs them money to cycle down power generation at night and back up at peak periods. If they flatten the usage curve a bit it helps them save money and not have to invest so much to hit higher peaks. I think more power companies will offer incentives as EV sakes climb and they see usage spike at undesirable times.
 
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when i picked up my car yesterday i was offered the choice of either a $500 ChargePoint credit or ChargePoint Home Charger.
Given that my electrician told me it would cost over $2k to extend a 220V line from our basement to the garage, as it would have to go through our finished basement, we opted for credit. Looking back I realized the home charger is valued at over $699!

What did everyone else choose?
I purchased my P8 two weeks ago and chose the Home Flex EVSE in lieu of the credit, planning to use the Home Flex at 48A once I receive it (4 weeks out?). In meantime, I've installed a 14-50 outlet with oversized 4awg wire from a 50A GFI breaker (per elect. code) and using a Grizzl EVSE at 40A. Once I receive the Home Flex, I will hardwire it and change out to a 60A breaker so I can charge at the full 48A.
 

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I purchased my P8 two weeks ago and chose the Home Flex EVSE in lieu of the credit, planning to use the Home Flex at 48A once I receive it (4 weeks out?). In meantime, I've installed a 14-50 outlet with oversized 4awg wire from a 50A GFI breaker (per elect. code) and using a Grizzl EVSE at 40A. Once I receive the Home Flex, I will hardwire it and change out to a 60A breaker so I can charge at the full 48A.
So you will hardware the ChargePoint as 48 amps through a 14-50 is a code violation. Hate to have had to wrangle 4awg wire, 6/3 was a big enough hassle. 6awg copper is rated up to 55amps at 140F and 65amps if rated for 167F, 4awg takes that to 70A and 85A and most NM (romex) I believe is rated to 90C
 

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This charges faster than the free cable that came with the car? Only charged public so far so not up on the home charging side of things.
Rule of thumb: 40 Amp breaker * 80% = 32 Amps (8 AWG wires). 60 Amp breaker * 80% = 48 Amps (6 AWG wires). I get about 17-19mi/ hr at the 32 Amp charging setting. Since it is recommended by Volvo to charge to 90% and not 100% to maintain a longer battery life, 90%*208mi=187mi. It’ll take 11-12 hours to charge from Zero. BTW, you should never drive down to Zero, rather for good practice nothing less than 20%. So for all intents and purposes, I just plug the car in overnight whenever the batteries are down to 60% or less.

Other comments:
1. 6AWG wire (6-3) is a lot more expensive/ft than the 8AWG (8-3), and is a lot thicker and harder to pull through walls, so I elected to just go with the 32Amp (40 Amp option) plug option.
2. Using the “50 Amp option” requires direct wiring, rather than a plug.
3. With the plug-in option, I can always upgrade easily by just unplugging the charger.
4. You can start by installing a 220V NEMA 14-50 outlet with a 40 Amp breaker and wiring. You can then plug in your Volvo supplied charger while you wait for the ChargePoint.
5. ChargePoint and other wall Home Chargers are usually “smart” and some have WiFi so you can interface via your Smarrtphone app.
6. Batteries are a lot happier if kept in the 20-80% charging range. They also operate more efficiently in warmer rather than in colder temps. That’s why during the colder months, the car range is reduced.
 

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1. 6AWG wire (6-3) is a lot more expensive/ft than the 8AWG (8-3), and is a lot thicker and harder to pull through walls, so I elected to just go with the 32Amp (40 Amp option) plug option.
2. Using the “50 Amp option” requires direct wiring, rather than a plug.
3. With the plug-in option, I can always upgrade easily by just unplugging the charger.
4. You can start by installing a 220V NEMA 14-50 outlet with a 40 Amp breaker and wiring. You can then plug in your Volvo supplied charger while you wait for the ChargePoint.
5.
6/3 to a NEMA 14-50 supports 40 amps via plugin with a 50 amp breaker. You should always put the breaker in to match the lowest common denominator and in this case that is the outlet which supports 40amps. You can undersize the breaker, but should never over size it.

Technically 8/3 I believe will support 40amsp, but I would not do it.

Also unless you will be in the home for a short period the minor increase in 6/3 is worth it in the long haul. It sucks to pull, but I spent a day doing it and get years of benefit. Cable, plug, box and breaker cost me under $400. Cable alone was $225 as I needed 40 feet. Hubbell commercial plug was $75.

Unless you are trying to change from very low to max in a short period 40amps and a plugin is fine. I routinely charge from 50% to 90% at 40 amps in 3.5 hours. Remember that as you go over 80% the car slows down the charge rate anyway.

One factor in deciding plugin vs. hardwire is GFCI. Most of the EVSEs come with built in with GFCI, but many building codes will require an outlet in the garage to be GFCI (breaker based for NEMA 14-50) protected. Protecting a GFCI device on a GFCI circuit can result in false breaker trips. That may drive some people to hardwire. to minimize breaker trips and stay compliant. At some point I will likely move my Wallbox to hardwired to remain fully compliant..
 
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No, guess I wasn't clear. The Home Flex will be hardwired directly -- not using the 14-50 outlet, which will be extracted and become a junction box -- per code. The 60A is borderline between requiring 4 o 6awg wire, so I went conservative (perhaps above code) and installed 4awg. Yes, it's heavy wire to pull thru, but I only needed to go a few feet, just outside my service panel -- so it was not so bad (or costly).
 
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