Volvo XC40 Forum banner
21 - 40 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
The documentation refers to installation by an electrician
Multiple Amazon reviews of the ChargePoint mention that when they submitted a warranty claim, they were required to submit a receipt for installation by a licensed electrician. I haven't received mine yet, but I do plan to pay to have mine installed for this reason even though it would otherwise be a pretty straightforward installation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Suppose x is the kwh you are going to use to charge your car over the years, 10 cents per kwh at home and 40 cents per kwh at a charging station. To break even, you need to have
0.1x + 2000 = 0.4x (2000 is the cost of installing a 240v outlet and/or a charging device)

Solving this equation gives you: x = 6666 kwh.
This translates to 17777 miles (6666 / 78 * 208).
I agree with your sentiment, but you have forgotten a time factor in your computation. You didn't pay yourself to sit at a fast charger for 6666 kwh. That being said, this is not how I would structure this decision, I would work the other direction.

1) Do you have Time of Use pricing? The 110 charger doesn't (currently) support charging schedules. I guess you could try to put a timer on the outlet.
2) Can you make up your day's commute using 110 charging? (for me the period of lowest rates begins at midnight and I leave for work at 6, so I have 6 hours to charge the car. At 110 this is about 42 miles of range added. If your commute significantly exceeds 42 miles per day then you should probably install the charger.

Let's assume a 45 mile commute, you are only running a 3 mile per day deficit, you can probably make this up on the weekend or visit a fast charger once per week.

Let's move to a 75 mile commute. Now you are running a 33 mile per day deficit. Realistically you only want to do this for a few days, let's see why:
Initial Charge
90%
187
DayReturn
Home
Next
Morning
Lowest %
111215453.94%
27912138.08%
3468822.21%

So by day 3 we have already gone below our 30% best practice threshold. We end up fast charging 2 to 3 times per week from 40% to 90%. That is about 30 kwh which could require 15 to 45 minutes based on the speed of the charger and factoring in that you are charging above 80%. Costing you at least a half hour, but more likely closer to two hours per week sitting at a fast charger. Multiply your hourly wage by 100 to see what two hours per week at a fast charger really costs. For many people that's the cost of the level 2 charger installation right there.

We could come up with a calculator but it would involve a ton of variables (distance extra travelled to fast charger) as well as personal preferences, my wife loves to sit at the charger and listen to her audio books. But one of the selling points of an EV is that you don't worry about fueling. It happens passively while you sleep and your car is always ready to go. Not everyone gets to live that dream, but I think that there is more than simply charging cost at work here.

Finally, charging at home is more cost controlled than fast chargers. The charging networks are running at a loss and will need to raise prices at some point. Charging at home is government regulated and less subject to market whims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
when i picked up my car yesterday i was offered the choice of either a $500 ChargePoint credit or ChargePoint Home Charger.
Given that my electrician told me it would cost over $2k to extend a 220V line from our basement to the garage, as it would have to go through our finished basement, we opted for credit. Looking back I realized the home charger is valued at over $699!

What did everyone else choose?
I just got my ChargePoint this week, left box sealed and put it up on eBay since I bought a Wallbox over 6 weeks ago when I go my car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Is this a promotion all dealerships are running? I just purchased an XC40 recharge and never heard about this promo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Is this a promotion all dealerships are running? I just purchased an XC40 recharge and never heard about this promo.


Talk to your dealer, there is a form they fill out and email to Volvo, then in about 3 weeks you get a voucher and use that to order one for free. You also get the option for$500 in Chargepoint credits for charging, but I opted for the charger and have it on eBay right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts

Talk to your dealer, there is a form they fill out and email to Volvo, then in about 3 weeks you get a voucher and use that to order one for free. You also get the option for$500 in Chargepoint credits for charging, but I opted for the charger and have it on eBay right now.
Going to pick up the vehicle in about an hour. Will ask dealership but am wondering if this is a location dependent promotion as I don't see any one advertising it in NJ. I, however, found a link for a dealership in Illinois advertising the promotion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Going to pick up the vehicle in about an hour. Will ask dealership but am wondering if this is a location dependent promotion as I don't see any one advertising it in NJ. I, however, found a link for a dealership in Illinois advertising the promotion.
You do not own a hybrid electric. That offer is not valid on the P8 pure electric.

The ChargePoint access allows you to establish an account through Volvo and use the car app.

I requires a CC to have full utilization.

As far as I am aware, there is no free charging through Volvo for the pure electric car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Going to pick up the vehicle in about an hour. Will ask dealership but am wondering if this is a location dependent promotion as I don't see any one advertising it in NJ. I, however, found a link for a dealership in Illinois advertising the promotion.
Yup, that is me, if that was you that inquired then yes. I received my free one Tuesday dn put it up on ebay as my Wallbox is working fine and it would be a hassle to put the Charepoint up as the plug is 180 opposite so I would have to fight the 6/3 wires to flip the outlet. Was not much fun wrestling the 6/3 the first time. If that is you, you can always use the charger cable that some with the car. That is what I did the first week, had it plugged into 120V until I got outlet run following week then used Volvo cable until the week after that until my Wallbox was installed. Be sure to see of PSE&G (if that is your power) has any night rates to charge off hours. So far in 7 weeks I have spent $4 in electricity to drive 935 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts

Talk to your dealer, there is a form they fill out and email to Volvo, then in about 3 weeks you get a voucher and use that to order one for free. You also get the option for$500 in Chargepoint credits for charging, but I opted for the charger and have it on eBay right now.
I asked my dealer about this and he had a deer in the head lights look on his face. I told him about the program and said he would look into it. I managed to find the below on a dealer site in IL. Any one here happen to have a link to program details or any other details I can forward to my dealership?

1059
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
The original deal expired 5/31, but not sure if Volvo renewed it. You can do to the volvocars.com website and chat with their customer service. They have been variety helpful.
 

·
Registered
2021 XC40 P8 - Bursting Blue
Joined
·
234 Posts
The original deal expired 5/31, but not sure if Volvo renewed it. You can do to the volvocars.com website and chat with their customer service. They have been variety helpful.
I'm going to guess this is a typo, but it struck me how apt it is. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Note that maybe 75% of the cost of installing a home charging station will be re-usable later on if you do decide to upgrade to a new charging station later on. I've had four different charging stations at my home since 2011. No need to replace conduit and wiring. I'm sure I'll be driving an electric car in the future (have 2 EVs and no gas cars now), so making the investment for home charging convenience was a no-brainer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Note that maybe 75% of the cost of installing a home charging station will be re-usable later on if you do decide to upgrade to a new charging station later on. I've had four different charging stations at my home since 2011. No need to replace conduit and wiring. I'm sure I'll be driving an electric car in the future (have 2 EVs and no gas cars now), so making the investment for home charging convenience was a no-brainer.
‘Do you have 2 EVSE? We eventually plan on getting a second EV and at some point will need to decide to either to do 2 EVSE with power sharing or either rotate garages parking side or hope the cord reaches wherever the next EV has it charge port.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I agree with your sentiment, but you have forgotten a time factor in your computation. You didn't pay yourself to sit at a fast charger for 6666 kwh. That being said, this is not how I would structure this decision, I would work the other direction.

1) Do you have Time of Use pricing? The 110 charger doesn't (currently) support charging schedules. I guess you could try to put a timer on the outlet.
2) Can you make up your day's commute using 110 charging? (for me the period of lowest rates begins at midnight and I leave for work at 6, so I have 6 hours to charge the car. At 110 this is about 42 miles of range added. If your commute significantly exceeds 42 miles per day then you should probably install the charger.

Let's assume a 45 mile commute, you are only running a 3 mile per day deficit, you can probably make this up on the weekend or visit a fast charger once per week.

Let's move to a 75 mile commute. Now you are running a 33 mile per day deficit. Realistically you only want to do this for a few days, let's see why:
Initial Charge
90%
187
DayReturn
Home
Next
Morning
Lowest %
111215453.94%
27912138.08%
3468822.21%

So by day 3 we have already gone below our 30% best practice threshold. We end up fast charging 2 to 3 times per week from 40% to 90%. That is about 30 kwh which could require 15 to 45 minutes based on the speed of the charger and factoring in that you are charging above 80%. Costing you at least a half hour, but more likely closer to two hours per week sitting at a fast charger. Multiply your hourly wage by 100 to see what two hours per week at a fast charger really costs. For many people that's the cost of the level 2 charger installation right there.

We could come up with a calculator but it would involve a ton of variables (distance extra travelled to fast charger) as well as personal preferences, my wife loves to sit at the charger and listen to her audio books. But one of the selling points of an EV is that you don't worry about fueling. It happens passively while you sleep and your car is always ready to go. Not everyone gets to live that dream, but I think that there is more than simply charging cost at work here.

Finally, charging at home is more cost controlled than fast chargers. The charging networks are running at a loss and will need to raise prices at some point. Charging at home is government regulated and less subject to market whims.
I do not pay myself when sitting in a couch watching TV either, or shopping in a nearby Walmart when charging my car at a EA charging station. So unless you really potentially earn money during that 40 minutes charging time, I would not include that imaginary earnings during that time in the calculation.

Again I definitely agree if you do commute daily, you should absolutely get a 240v outlet installed, especially if your daily commute trip is long, say, in your example, 75 miles or more (that's already "almost" half of this car's range, which is another reason I do not want to keep the car for too long, since I truly believe in the next few years, EV's range should be able to get improved. 208 miles would be a BIG joke by that time). My point is, I do not want to blindly invest in something that will "absolutely" get improved in a few years (unless it's cheap). So if one's situation is more similar to mine (work from home for most of the time, short commute distance, etc.), you might want to think again about whether spending that money to have a 240v outlet installed makes sense or not. However, if one's situation is more similar to commuting long distance daily, then you might want to think again about NOT having a 240v outlet installed.

As a data point, this Saturday when I finished my shopping trip and arrived home at around 4pm, my car had 82% left. So I plugged in the 110v outlet, and in the Sunday's morning around 7:30am when I woke up, I checked the car and it's fully charged. I have no idea when it's finished charging, but having a 240v outlet and finishing charging at 6pm the same day would not benefit me more in any way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Certainly if you fast charge occasionally you probably don't care about the time, but if you do it frequently it starts to make a difference. My time is valuable to me whether I am getting paid for it or not, especially since I already have a 3+ hour commute.

During the summer my electricity costs me almost $.60/kwh in the evenings. That's 6 times higher the price at night. That means I can't just leave it plugged in. Being able to charge faster and on a timer is an additional reason to get a level 2 charger.


I'm not saying your wrong, I was just providing context for others who have different situations. Yes, that could be longer commutes or it could be time of use electric rates or less access to available fast charging because of distance or being in high demand.

I had previously put together a sheet that compares electric rates in San Diego and shows what commute length mandates each rate plan. I assumed level 2 charging. I suppose I could extend it to show level 1 charging with and without a timer.

Finally, not installing a charger now because something better well come along is probably not a great idea for two reasons.

First Level 2 charging is fairly maxed out at this point. A 60 AMP 220 V circuit is probably as big as most houses can handle. Second, the current incentives to install a home charger will not last forever and, as someone else pointed out, most of the work will be useful in the future. If you can take advantage of the tax break and you will do it someday then installing now makes sense.

In addition to the timer I've mentioned before there are additional non financial reasons to use an L2 charger including monitoring and alerts. Yesterday my GFCI circuit in the garage had tripped and I didn't realize the car was not being charged until it was too late to charge it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Certainly if you fast charge occasionally you probably don't care about the time, but if you do it frequently it starts to make a difference. My time is valuable to me whether I am getting paid for it or not, especially since I already have a 3+ hour commute.

During the summer my electricity costs me almost $.60/kwh in the evenings. That's 6 times higher the price at night. That means I can't just leave it plugged in. Being able to charge faster and on a timer is an additional reason to get a level 2

Ouch. Y peak is only $.134 and then my super off peak is $0,045 kWh and they give me 400 kWh free of super off peak. This. I think due to,ACat night and car I used $8 of electricity that I had to pay for from midnight to 6am and put somewhere around 450 miles for that $8. Fall and winter will be bet tee when AC is not running at night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
‘Do you have 2 EVSE? We eventually plan on getting a second EV and at some point will need to decide to either to do 2 EVSE with power sharing or either rotate garages parking side or hope the cord reaches wherever the next EV has it charge port.
Yes, I have a Tesla HPWC hardwired on a 60A circuit in the longer garage space (Tesla Model 3), and a Chargepoint Flex hardwired on a 40A circuit in the shorter garage space (XC40 P8). I moved an existing 40A charging circuit from the garage front wall to the back to suit the XC40's rear charge port location. That 40A circuit has had three different EVSEs connected at one time or another: 2011 Blink (went into the trash can), 2015 Clipper Creek (I later gave to my brother when he bought a Bolt), and now a 2021 Chargepoint Home Flex.

We just made the jump to 2 EVs and no gasoline cars. With the current state of electric vehicles, if you aren't going to keep an ICE car for long trips, it's handy to have a Tesla for longest range / trip charging convenience. They do have many shortcomings, but excel at that one thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Yes, I have a Tesla HPWC hardwired on a 60A circuit in the longer garage space (Tesla Model 3), and a Chargepoint Flex hardwired on a 40A circuit in the shorter garage space (XC40 P8). I moved an existing 40A charging circuit from the garage front wall to the back to suit the XC40's rear charge port location. That 40A circuit has had three different EVSEs connected at one time or another: 2011 Blink (went into the trash can), 2015 Clipper Creek (I later gave to my brother when he bought a Bolt), and now a 2021 Chargepoint Home Flex.

We just made the jump to 2 EVs and no gasoline cars. With the current state of electric vehicles, if you aren't going to keep an ICE car for long trips, it's handy to have a Tesla for longest range / trip charging convenience. They do have many shortcomings, but excel at that one thing.
Thanks. I will need to figure out power, while I have a 150A panel not sure I would want 2 cars pully 40A at same time.
 
21 - 40 of 64 Posts
Top