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Hi all. With a 60 A circuit, a 220v outlet, and the car set to accept the maximum amps (48), the car is still charging at best 21 mph, whether with a charge station or directly plugged into the wall. I'm just curious how that compares the XC40 community out there. What's the fastest charge rate you're achieving, both with charging station or just plugged in? Thanks!
 

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That does seem low to me. If you’re using the NEMA 14-50 plug it will max out at 40 amps and not (80% of 50 amps for the receptacle). I’m not sure what that translates to in mph, but at a 6.6 KWh charger I get about 32 kph (I think that’s 30 amps).
 

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but charge rate depends on the state of charge, If you are below 50% it will charge faster than from 80% to 100%
 

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xc40 charges with 11.5kwh on 14-50 circuit,
Isn’t this only for a hardwired installation? I’m not an electrician, but I believe the electric code is that for constant draw a circuit should not exceed 80% of the rated capacity of the connection (at least for Canada, but I think US too). 48 amps x 240 volts is 11.5KWh, but following the 80% rule the max draw should be 9.6KWh (40 amps x 240 volts).

I thought a hardwired charging station would be the only way to achieve the max amps, since the 14-50 receptacle is the limiting factor for amp ratings (assuming wiring and breakers are all above 50 amp ratings).
 

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Isn’t this only for a hardwired installation? I’m not an electrician, but I believe the electric code is that for constant draw a circuit should not exceed 80% of the rated capacity of the connection (at least for Canada, but I think US too). 48 amps x 240 volts is 11.5KWh, but following the 80% rule the max draw should be 9.6KWh (40 amps x 240 volts).

I thought a hardwired charging station would be the only way to achieve the max amps, since the 14-50 receptacle is the limiting factor for amp ratings (assuming wiring and breakers are all above 50 amp ratings).
14-50 is 50A - uses 60A braker
 

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14-50 is 50A - uses 60A braker
At your own risk and likely against code NEC Section 210.20(A). While a 60A breaker would work on a 14-50 receptacle, it's not wise to do so long term if you value safety. I don't know of any reputable receptacle based EVSE that intentionally draws more than 40A sustained (50A rated). Yes, it is possible to buy a 48A (60A rated) unit, which is meant to be hardwired, and instead wire it to a 14-50R. That would go against its intended design. Also, the choice of receptacle brand is important when near the extremes of its rated current draw over time. Read here:

the reliability of charging on a NEMA 14-50 outlet is limited by design and quality of the outlet your electrician buys. There is a $15 (Leviton brand) residential grade NEMA 14-50 outlet sold at Home Depot that is not sufficient to support daily vehicle charging. The Leviton outlet has fiberglass insulators that tend to melt out after a few months of vehicle charging. The outlets are not designed specifically for EV charging; they are designed for plugging in RVs and range ovens. Ranges will pull max power once in a while when we roast a turkey, but EV charging will be pulling maximum amperage for hours on end every night. For this heavy use, we recommend an industrial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet, by one of these three brands: Hubbell, Bryant, or Cooper. These use glass or ceramic insulators and should last 3-5 years before they, too, eventually need to be replaced. At $50 – $100, they are not cheap. https://www.seahurst.com/nema-14-50-tesla/
 

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At your own risk and likely against code NEC Section 210.20(A). While a 60A breaker would work on a 14-50 receptacle, it's not wise to do so long term if you value safety. I don't know of any reputable receptacle based EVSE that intentionally draws more than 40A sustained (50A rated). Yes, it is possible to buy a 48A (60A rated) unit, which is meant to be hardwired, and instead wire it to a 14-50R. That would go against its intended design. Also, the choice of receptacle brand is important when near the extremes of its rated current draw over time. Read here:

the reliability of charging on a NEMA 14-50 outlet is limited by design and quality of the outlet your electrician buys. There is a $15 (Leviton brand) residential grade NEMA 14-50 outlet sold at Home Depot that is not sufficient to support daily vehicle charging. The Leviton outlet has fiberglass insulators that tend to melt out after a few months of vehicle charging. The outlets are not designed specifically for EV charging; they are designed for plugging in RVs and range ovens. Ranges will pull max power once in a while when we roast a turkey, but EV charging will be pulling maximum amperage for hours on end every night. For this heavy use, we recommend an industrial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet, by one of these three brands: Hubbell, Bryant, or Cooper. These use glass or ceramic insulators and should last 3-5 years before they, too, eventually need to be replaced. At $50 – $100, they are not cheap. https://www.seahurst.com/nema-14-50-tesla/
Here, where I am, Canadian code applies. Not US code
 

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At your own risk and likely against code NEC Section 210.20(A). While a 60A breaker would work on a 14-50 receptacle, it's not wise to do so long term if you value safety. I don't know of any reputable receptacle based EVSE that intentionally draws more than 40A sustained (50A rated). Yes, it is possible to buy a 48A (60A rated) unit, which is meant to be hardwired, and instead wire it to a 14-50R. That would go against its intended design. Also, the choice of receptacle brand is important when near the extremes of its rated current draw over time. Read here:

the reliability of charging on a NEMA 14-50 outlet is limited by design and quality of the outlet your electrician buys. There is a $15 (Leviton brand) residential grade NEMA 14-50 outlet sold at Home Depot that is not sufficient to support daily vehicle charging. The Leviton outlet has fiberglass insulators that tend to melt out after a few months of vehicle charging. The outlets are not designed specifically for EV charging; they are designed for plugging in RVs and range ovens. Ranges will pull max power once in a while when we roast a turkey, but EV charging will be pulling maximum amperage for hours on end every night. For this heavy use, we recommend an industrial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet, by one of these three brands: Hubbell, Bryant, or Cooper. These use glass or ceramic insulators and should last 3-5 years before they, too, eventually need to be replaced. At $50 – $100, they are not cheap. https://www.seahurst.com/nema-14-50-tesla/
The largest producer of EV chargers is doing wrong according to your information:

They use 14-50 plug and you can draw 50A with a 60A braker

 

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The exact same plug is used nearly for all large RV's with 50A service for decades. If you are not comfortable don't use it. Again, the electrical code in Canada is not the same as in US.
Right, I'm not comfortable with using a 14-50R with a continuous 48A load being 'protected' by a 60A breaker.

And I don't know what you're trying to prove by mentioning RV's. As I posted earlier, it is well known that RV's and range ovens are a totally different 'use case' for 50A receptacles. They are not considered 'continuous' loads.
 

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Right, I'm not comfortable with using a 14-50R with a continuous 48A load being 'protected' by a 60A breaker.

And I don't know what you're trying to prove by mentioning RV's. As I posted earlier, it is well known that RV's and range ovens are a totally different 'use case' for 50A receptacles. They are not considered 'continuous' loads.
thousands of RVs especially 5th wheels run 2-3 AC units plus all other appliances non-stop. Sometimes more than 6-8 hours charging a day. BTW I am an electronics engineer and have some knowledge.
Just stop replying as you will be not convinced with what I say and I will be not convinced with what you say. Just charge your car slower and be happy.
 

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At your own risk and likely against code NEC Section 210.20(A). While a 60A breaker would work on a 14-50 receptacle, it's not wise to do so long term if you value safety. I don't know of any reputable receptacle based EVSE that intentionally draws more than 40A sustained (50A rated). Yes, it is possible to buy a 48A (60A rated) unit, which is meant to be hardwired, and instead wire it to a 14-50R. That would go against its intended design. Also, the choice of receptacle brand is important when near the extremes of its rated current draw over time. Read here:

the reliability of charging on a NEMA 14-50 outlet is limited by design and quality of the outlet your electrician buys. There is a $15 (Leviton brand) residential grade NEMA 14-50 outlet sold at Home Depot that is not sufficient to support daily vehicle charging. The Leviton outlet has fiberglass insulators that tend to melt out after a few months of vehicle charging. The outlets are not designed specifically for EV charging; they are designed for plugging in RVs and range ovens. Ranges will pull max power once in a while when we roast a turkey, but EV charging will be pulling maximum amperage for hours on end every night. For this heavy use, we recommend an industrial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet, by one of these three brands: Hubbell, Bryant, or Cooper. These use glass or ceramic insulators and should last 3-5 years before they, too, eventually need to be replaced. At $50 – $100, they are not cheap. https://www.seahurst.com/nema-14-50-tesla/
Agree. I had the Leviton, then ordered the Hubbell, huge difference in build quality. Remember these thing pull 40A non stop for potentially hours, that is going to warm up. Sure an electric stove uses same outlet, but it does not draw 40 amps non-stop, it ramps up and down thus the connection point TVs will, to get as hot.
 

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To answer the OP's question, I was getting only a 23A draw (~13MPH in the display) with my Blink 240V home unit, but that's because the Blink first gen EVSE had overheating problems and was limited to 24 A intentionally. I have since plugged the Volvo's cable directly into the 50A circuit (with a 40A breaker) and charged at a 40A rate. I've only charged this way once since I haven't had it very long. If I get different rates on future charges, I'll let you know. I don't know how that translates to MPH, but I think 21 is about right. I'll check it next time I charge.
 

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To answer the OP's question, I was getting only a 23A draw (~13MPH in the display) with my Blink 240V home unit, but that's because the Blink first gen EVSE had overheating problems and was limited to 24 A intentionally. I have since plugged the Volvo's cable directly into the 50A circuit (with a 40A breaker) and charged at a 40A rate. I've only charged this way once since I haven't had it very long. If I get different rates on future charges, I'll let you know. I don't know how that translates to MPH, but I think 21 is about right. I'll check it next time I charge.
The supplied charging cable is rated for 40A max charging. I am usually getting 39A
 

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I just started charging. The Volvo was set at 40A max and the cable got to 39A, 20MPH on the display.
 

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So does the Volvo supplied cable have a Nema 14-50 adapter plug or just straight 120?
 
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